November 15, 2019

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Nakajima Taishodo

Established in 1912

Located in Osaka

Nakajima Taishodo employee making Japanese sweets

Nakajima Taishodo's long history began in 1912, with the founder Jirobei Nakajima. From the beginning, their mission has been the same, "to make sweets for the most important people," aka, you, the customer. Customers come first in everything Nakajima Taishodo does, and it shows in their delicious snacks.

Nakajima Taishodo began without a storefront. They had no shops of their own, and started as a confectionery making and selling their snacks, cookies, etc. to other businesses in the area. As you all know, Nakajima Taishodo makes some seriously delicious treats. So as more customers bought the cakes and cookies they made for other local businesses, Nakajima Taishodo's business grew too.

In 1971, they expanded

and created a new brand called "Danke" from the German word for "thank you." To Nakajima Taishodo, their most important philosophy is what they call "Danke-ism," which I will translate as thankfulness. With this new brand of sweets (mostly small cakes and jellies), they wanted customers to choose Danke when they wanted to say "thank you," whether to themselves or others.

It wasn't until 2017 that Nakajima Taishodo released another new line of treats under a new brand "Hitotoe." Full of delicious western-style cakes and cookies, ice creams, and yokan, we're so happy to have included many of their snacks in our boxes. This month, both the Koganeimo Golden Sweet Potato Cake and Matcha Chocolate Stick Cake come from the Hitotoe brand line. At the heart of this line of high-quality confections is the belief that the food you give or share with someone has the power to share your sentiments as well. When you need to share something, happy or sad, with someone, Hitotoe's confections can help convey your thoughts. It speaks to Japan's gifting culture, where actions are just as important as words to express your feelings.

Tsukisamu Anpan: Kabocha Pumpkin

Sold out
Market - Hoen Tea (1 Bag)

Sold out
Market - Hoen Tea (1 Bag)

Sold out
Market - Hoen Tea (1 Bag)

Sold out
fresh japanese financier cakes

Freshly baked financier cakes

The food you give or share with someone has the power to share your sentiments as well.

Even the Nakajima Taishodo logo, a tree of life, symbolizes their dedication to their customers and employees. The five leaves symbolize customer, company, supporter, supplier, and employee growth, while the red fruit is the fruit of their efforts. Each of these leaves even has a promise associated with it, including creating an environment where employees can grow and individuality is embraced, and practicing environmentally-friendly activities. All promises we can get behind!

With so much thought and care put into their snacks, it’s no wonder they’re so delicious!

Historic photo of Nakajima Taishodo

Historic photo of Nakajima Taishodo

A pâtissier and apprentice photographed at work at nakajima taishodo

A pâtissier and apprentice photographed at work

Nakajima Taishodo

Established in 1912

Located in Osaka

Nakajima Taishodo employee making Japanese sweets

Nakajima Taishodo's long history began in 1912, with the founder Jirobei Nakajima. From the beginning, their mission has been the same, "to make sweets for the most important people," aka, you, the customer. Customers come first in everything Nakajima Taishodo does, and it shows in their delicious snacks.

Nakajima Taishodo began without a storefront. They had no shops of their own, and started as a confectionery making and selling their snacks, cookies, etc. to other businesses in the area. As you all know, Nakajima Taishodo makes some seriously delicious treats. So as more customers bought the cakes and cookies they made for other local businesses, Nakajima Taishodo's business grew too.

In 1971, they expanded

and created a new brand called "Danke" from the German word for "thank you." To Nakajima Taishodo, their most important philosophy is what they call "Danke-ism," which I will translate as thankfulness. With this new brand of sweets (mostly small cakes and jellies), they wanted customers to choose Danke when they wanted to say "thank you," whether to themselves or others.

It wasn't until 2017 that Nakajima Taishodo released another new line of treats under a new brand "Hitotoe." Full of delicious western-style cakes and cookies, ice creams, and yokan, we're so happy to have included many of their snacks in our boxes. This month, both the Koganeimo Golden Sweet Potato Cake and Matcha Chocolate Stick Cake come from the Hitotoe brand line. At the heart of this line of high-quality confections is the belief that the food you give or share with someone has the power to share your sentiments as well. When you need to share something, happy or sad, with someone, Hitotoe's confections can help convey your thoughts. It speaks to Japan's gifting culture, where actions are just as important as words to express your feelings.

Tsukisamu Anpan: Kabocha Pumpkin

Sold out
Market - Hoen Tea (1 Bag)

Sold out
Market - Hoen Tea (1 Bag)

Sold out
Market - Hoen Tea (1 Bag)

Sold out
fresh japanese financier cakes

Freshly baked financier cakes

The food you give or share with someone has the power to share your sentiments as well.

Even the Nakajima Taishodo logo, a tree of life, symbolizes their dedication to their customers and employees. The five leaves symbolize customer, company, supporter, supplier, and employee growth, while the red fruit is the fruit of their efforts. Each of these leaves even has a promise associated with it, including creating an environment where employees can grow and individuality is embraced, and practicing environmentally-friendly activities. All promises we can get behind!

With so much thought and care put into their snacks, it’s no wonder they’re so delicious!

Historic photo of Nakajima Taishodo

Historic photo of Nakajima Taishodo

A pâtissier and apprentice photographed at work at nakajima taishodo

A pâtissier and apprentice photographed at work

Meet Our Other Makers Here:

Julia LiMarzi
Julia LiMarzi

Julia has two passions in life: traveling and food. She fell in love with Japan during her first trip to Tokyo and studied Japanese in college. She loves all things Studio Ghibli, Harry Potter, or Lord of the Rings, and spends her free time baking or reading.