December 13, 2019

Akai Ribon

Established in 1978

Located in Hokkaido

a patissier in akai ribon's workshop

Akai Ribbon is located in a small city on the west edge of Hokkaido Prefecture. Since their first sweet shop opened in 1978, in the founder Takaya-san’s hometown, they’ve dedicated themselves to being a truly local company.

Hokkaido is well known for its agriculture, often producing the majority of Japan's dairy, corn, wheat, soy, potatoes, and more. Akai Ribbon takes great pride in the region’s produce and celebrates local ingredients in every sweet. But why settle in Iwamizawa?

The city of Iwamizawa

is relatively small, with a lazy river winding slowly through it, and farmland on all sides. Time flows like the river, relaxed and full of life. Being surrounded by such rich nature inspires the patissier at Akai Ribon. Vineyards and apple orchards are just a short bit away. In winter, the city's rice turns into delicious sake. In the slower, pastoral pace of Iwamizawa, they have all the time and ingredients needed to create new and delicious sweets.

Those who know the delights of Akai Ribbon will gladly take the short train ride from Sapporo

Akai Ribbon has continued their traditions as a small-batch maker to this day. While other makers might choose to have machines handle the whole snack-making process, Akai Ribon's employees are still hand-making their sweets, from rolling the dough of Kitsune no Shippo by hand to dipping it into a thick, creamy layer of maple white chocolate. Because of this, each pastry is unique and has that home-made quality that makes them so delicious.

Maple is featured prominently in many of Akai Ribon's sweets. Japan has a growing fondness for all things maple syrup and has even started producing some domestically. This snack maker's love of maple syrup truly goes beyond baking, even naming their second store, "Maple Club." Although Akai Ribon still relies on Canadian maple syrup, they are eagerly supporting the burgeoning Hokkaido maple syrup industry, and hope to soon be making all of their sweets with 100% local syrup.

Both of their storefronts are in Iwamizawa, and they're content to keep their footprint to Hokkaido. Those who know the delights of Akai Ribbon will gladly take the short train ride from Sapporo to enjoy the quaint atmosphere of their shops.

founder and head patissier of Akai Ribon Japanese bakery

Takaya-san, Founder of Akai Ribon

bokksu at akai ribon maple club in hokkaido

The Bokksu team meets Takaya-san (front left of sign) at the Maple Club

freshly made kitsune no shippo akai ribon

Freshly made Kitsune no Shippo

Akai Ribon

Established in 1978

Located in Hokkaido

a patissier in akai ribon's workshop

Akai Ribbon is located in a small city on the west edge of Hokkaido Prefecture. Since their first sweet shop opened in 1978, in the founder Takaya-san’s hometown, they’ve dedicated themselves to being a truly local company.

Hokkaido is well known for its agriculture, often producing the majority of Japan's dairy, corn, wheat, soy, potatoes, and more. Akai Ribbon takes great pride in the region’s produce and celebrates local ingredients in every sweet. But why settle in Iwamizawa?

The city of Iwamizawa

is relatively small, with a lazy river winding slowly through it, and farmland on all sides. Time flows like the river, relaxed and full of life. Being surrounded by such rich nature inspires the patissier at Akai Ribon. Vineyards and apple orchards are just a short bit away. In winter, the city's rice turns into delicious sake. In the slower, pastoral pace of Iwamizawa, they have all the time and ingredients needed to create new and delicious sweets.

Those who know the delights of Akai Ribbon will gladly take the short train ride from Sapporo

Akai Ribbon has continued their traditions as a small-batch maker to this day. While other makers might choose to have machines handle the whole snack-making process, Akai Ribon's employees are still hand-making their sweets, from rolling the dough of Kitsune no Shippo by hand to dipping it into a thick, creamy layer of maple white chocolate. Because of this, each pastry is unique and has that home-made quality that makes them so delicious.

Maple is featured prominently in many of Akai Ribon's sweets. Japan has a growing fondness for all things maple syrup and has even started producing some domestically. This snack maker's love of maple syrup truly goes beyond baking, even naming their second store, "Maple Club." Although Akai Ribon still relies on Canadian maple syrup, they are eagerly supporting the burgeoning Hokkaido maple syrup industry, and hope to soon be making all of their sweets with 100% local syrup.

Both of their storefronts are in Iwamizawa, and they're content to keep their footprint to Hokkaido. Those who know the delights of Akai Ribbon will gladly take the short train ride from Sapporo to enjoy the quaint atmosphere of their shops.

founder and head patissier of Akai Ribon Japanese bakery

Takaya-san, Founder of Akai Ribon

bokksu at akai ribon maple club in hokkaido

The Bokksu team meets Takaya-san (front left of sign) at the Maple Club

freshly made kitsune no shippo akai ribon

Freshly made Kitsune no Shippo

Meet Our Other Makers Here:

Julia LiMarzi
Julia LiMarzi

Julia has two passions in life: traveling and food. She fell in love with Japan during her first trip to Tokyo and studied Japanese in college. She loves all things Studio Ghibli, Harry Potter, or Lord of the Rings, and spends her free time baking or reading.


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